Taking on the Philippines Part 2 – Boracay!

Like I said before, I never was a fan of the beach. But then again I’ve never been to Bali, nor Koh Samui, nor Boracay. I wasn’t sure if I was hesitant or frightened. There were butterflies in my tummy just thinking about having to wear a swimsuit, baring my pallid white skin in the sun AND engaging in some form of sport that is not as easy as sun tanning.

The journey to there started from Clark, where we took a swift AirAsia domestic flight in the evening to Kalibo, followed by a 1h 45min bus ride to Caticlan, and another 15min ferry to Boracay. It was a little harsh. Think narrow, meandering roads with low light then choppy seas at an old jetty, but when we docked at Boracay we were instantly uplifted.  The shallow waters were blue even at night! Now that’s something.

In the morning, an outrigger boat took us out for snorkeling and island hopping. It was my first time snorkeling. I didn’t even attempt to hold my breath to go deeper into the 4m deep water, I was just bopping along the surface. Still I marveled at the corals and the fish. Every few meters a thought bubble went off in my head like a child learning new words – Nemo! Dory! Coral! Urchin! Wow!

I was a little reluctant to get out of the water. I never imagined myself to like it so much! But next we went island hopping, and landed on Puka Beach, where you can find lots of puka shells. However a few of us were more interested in the blue, blue water, sitting along the shore and having the waves crash onto us. That is just splendid.

My threshold for outdoor activities ends about…. here. (And so did my immune system that day.) If it suits your fancy you can busy yourself with more land and sea sports like diving, cliff diving, ATV riding, jet-skiiing, banana boating, etc. I was more interested in strolling the streets and digging in on the grilled seafood and barbecued meats that Boracay is famous for. We got to choose from the fresh catch at the local market, then bring it to a nearby restaurant to cook in their local fashion. That was satisfying.

I assume it’s not a beach holiday until you see the sun set over the water, so I headed to the White Beach to do just that. Turns out about five thousand other people thought the same. The beach was insanely crowded but just walk some and you’ll find your own little space. It is called White Beach because the sand is super fine (there’s a vast difference between Puka beach and here, and of course, Sentosa), and super white, and apparently never is scorching even in the afternoon sun.

When you get away from the beach and resorts, you’ll see some locals and also the ethnic Ati people of the island still around, some selling anything from fish to souvenirs on the road side, others performing for tips or begging, and little kids scampering around. They’ve got an otherworldliness to them – not ethereal, but real.

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The best time to visit Boracay for the clearest, bluest waters and fine weather. You’ve just got a few weeks to plan possibly the first getaway of the year. So head over here to book that flight now!

Check out the pics we posted while lapping up the salty seas, either on Instagram, #airasiasgcrk, or just click here.

 

 

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